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Drill Pipe Thread Identificati ...

Posted on: Dec 21, 2013 By: admin | 0 Comments
First of all, there are lots of threads out there that are not covered by this chart.  There are Z threads, Robbins Threads, LT425 threads, Etc.  With our chart, we tried to cover the API rotary shouldered connections like the API Reg, API IF, and API FH along with the API Numbered Connections.  I included some of the more common waterwell threads like the Mayhew and FEDP and threw in some mining threads like the BECO. The purpose of this chart is to give you an idea of what thread you have.  I certainly do not recommend using this chart ... Read More

Choosing your connections. Wha ...

Posted on: Dec 21, 2013 By: admin | 0 Comments
When you buy a rig, how much thought do you give your drill pipe and in particular to your connections?  Drill pipe diameter can dictate your best hole size range to meet your needs of the type of work you do.  What about your connections? Connections will dictate the internal diameter, torsional strength of your drill pipe, how well it withstands bending stresses, how it fits in with your tools, and the availability of drill string components. If you’re an air driller,  the ID may not be so important but if you need fluid volume, then ... Read More

Field Note: What was I thinkin ...

Posted on: Dec 21, 2013 By: admin | 0 Comments
Problems happen.  I have traveled to various locations to look at these problems.  I thought I would share some stories that might help others with similar incidences. Years ago while working  for another company, we received a call that some drill pipe we had manufactured started have severe thread galling issues. These were 4 1/2″ x 25′ with 3 1/2 Reg connections running on a Driltech D40K rig in the Mountains near the California / Nevada border. I met up with Bob Freeman the Driltech rep for that area & we headed out in ... Read More

Bit Weight: A Key Factor in Dr ...

Posted on: Dec 21, 2013 By: admin | 0 Comments
A very important factor in your drill string design & drill pipe performance is bit weight. Every bit is designed to run with a given amount of down pressure to work properly. It takes a certain amount of push. When drilling vertically, this is bit weight. Whether drilling with a tricone bit or hammer bit, the manufacturer sets an ideal weight to get the best performance from the bit. Different manufacturers will have their own chart or formula. For DTH hammer bits, I have seen a set weight of 6500 pounds to 7700 pounds total bit weight ... Read More

What is an upset and do you ne ...

Posted on: May 25, 2012 By: admin | 2 Comments
If you are drilling deep with a mud rotary or perhaps drilling 5,000 feet for natural gas, then you are familiar with the term “upset”. Sometimes elevator shouldered drill pipe, where the tool joints are larger in diameter than the tubes, are referred to as upset drill pipe. In reality, drill pipe is considered upset when the tubes are upset prior to welding. Upsetting is a forging process that makes for a thicker wall on the tube ends. The tube ends are heated to a near liquid state. The heated end is then placed in the upsetter ... Read More

What is Make Up Torque? ...

Posted on: Mar 26, 2010 By: admin | 1 Comment
If you have ever had a pin thread break or perhaps the box shoulder has flared or mushroomed, then you might have a problem with make up torque. Make up torque is the recommended amount of torque to apply when tightening your drill pipe prior to running it down the hole. The amount depends on the connection, the inside diameter of the pin, and the outside diameter of the box. A lot of common thread problems can be traced back to improper make up torque. If too little is applied (running loose), then connections could continue to tighten during ... Read More

Troubleshooting Thread Problem ...

Posted on: Mar 23, 2010 By: admin | 0 Comments
Thread problems are the most common problem encountered with the use of drill pipe. The purpose of this section is to help locate potential causes and correct them. It is important to note that an exact cause may not be found but the problem can be made to go away. One of the characteristics of thread problems is that it spreads throughout your drill string. This happens as one damaged thread connects with another. If the top sub becomes infected, then the problem propagates with every connection made with the top sub. When a thread problem ... Read More

Drill Pipe Break In Procedures ...

Posted on: Mar 23, 2010 By: admin | 0 Comments
When using new drill pipe for the first time, it is important to take care not to damage the threads and also to reduce initial wear. Below are some procedures and suggestions to avoid thread problems. Most thread problems that we have encountered occur with the first couple of uses of new drill pipe. Inspect the lower connection in the top sub to make sure the threads are in good condition. By good condition, the connection should be free from breaks and rough spots on the threads and the threads are not too worn. If you are putting on a ... Read More